Am I Addicted To Porn?  Signs and What To Do

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Whether or not behavioral addictions, such as porn addiction, are “actual” addictions is highly debated in the psychiatric and treatment communities.

One of the most reported behavioral addictions is porn addiction, or feeling a compulsion to watch porn and not being able to stop. Porn addiction refers to a person becoming emotionally dependent on pornography to the point that it interferes with their daily life, relationships, and ability to function.

It is important to watch out for signs of porn addiction.

1. Signs of porn addiction

Following signs indicate that you may be addicted to porn

1.1 You are unable to stop

They have an attachment to porn that has taken over your regular routine. You are aware of the adverse effects, but no longer have control over it. You lose control and are unable to stop using or viewing pornography, despite trying to do so. If you can’t stop, you may notice that you are spending more and more time on the internet despite others’ attempts to communicate with you.

1.2 You become angry frequently

Like with any addiction, if you can’t stop using porn, you may become easily irritable when it’s not available. You may find your patience wearing thin, especially with tasks you view as obstacles to porn use. If someone is honest about a problem existing it may be met with anger or hostility. You may become more defensive and combative toward the people around you.This can also make it easier to lash out at your partner, who could notice major changes in your personality and feel that you’re not the same person that they had loved before.

1.3 You prioritize watching porn over other activities

Giving up on interesting, important, or pleasurable activities to watch porn instead is a sign of addiction. You might also start making excuses for it you may also engages in risky behavior to view pornography, such as doing so at work.

Another sign that a person may be developing an unhealthy relationship with porn include that they ignore other responsibilities to view pornography. It is important to ask yourself whether you are thinking honestly about the amount of time and energy you spend finding and using pornography

1.4 You start to become less satisfied with your partner

Use of pornography may also affect people’s relationships. For example, some research indicates that pornography creates unrealistic expectations of sex. Pornography causes relationship issues or makes a person feel less satisfied with their partner.

1.5 You have cravings thoughts all the time

Physical and psychological cravings and difficulty in focusing on anything else are effectively withdrawal symptoms and therefore indicate addiction. If you often find yourself occupied with thoughts or cravings for pornography, this is a strong sign of addiction. This is one of the ways in which addiction increases its influence and control over someone’s life.

1.6 Isolating oneself from friends and family as a result of addiction

You may face problems at home with family, work, or other commitments as a result of it but continue even though it causes issues with loved ones.

To avoid such issues you isolate yourself from family and friends also fail to fulfill personal obligations because of excessive use of porn

2. How to cope with it

Here are few ways to cope with your addiction

2.1 Try to set firm goals

Just like any other behavior change, making goals and then working toward reaching them can help you get a handle on the behavior some goals include:

  • Consider if there are any triggers and try to avoid them.
  • When you want to view porn, remind yourself how it has affected your life
  • Partner up with someone else who will ask about your porn habit and hold you accountable
  • Have someone else install anti-porn software on your electronic devices without giving you the password.
  • Delete all forms of porn from your electronics

2.2 Physical activity and exercising helps a lot

Staying physically active may help you find a way to refocus your energy in a healthier and more productive way.

Being physically active can improve your brain health, help manage weight, reduce the risk of disease, strengthen bones and muscles, and improve your ability to do everyday activities.

Additionally exercise improves mental health by reducing anxiety, depression, and negative mood and by improving self-esteem and cognitive function. Exercise has also been found to alleviate symptoms such as low self-esteem and social withdrawal. It also stimulates the production of endorphins, chemicals in the brain that are the body's natural painkillers and mood elevators.

2.3 Distract yourself at times of craving

If you find yourself tempted to engage in the behavior when you are bored, look for other things you can do to stay busy.

Taking time to participate in other activities can help shift your focus to other fulfilling behaviors. Some activities to try include: Yoga and running.

2.4 Try to keep yourself busy

A hobby, even one you do alone can help. Take some time to invest in yourself and your interests and keep your mind occupied in the process.

If you don’t have any hobbies, make it a priority to find one. Experiment with different activities, from fishing to pottery, until you discover things that you love doing.

2. 5 It is okay to seek help

You don't have to confront your porn addiction alone. A mental health professional who is experienced in treating sexual dysfunction can help you address how your behavior has impacted your life and the lives of those around you.

2.6 A support group might help

Many people find strength in talking to others who have firsthand experience with the same issue.

Takeaway

It is important to be able to speak openly if you believe that you or someone you know is exhibiting any of the signs of porn addiction. Only by opening up to the idea of help can anyone get better.

If prnography causes relationship problems or if a person wants to cut down on their pornography use but feels unable to do so. Then it may be a good idea to see a therapist.

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